A second avian flu epidemic broke out in the Flemish Houtulst, also in West German Karel | Pluimveeweb.nl

Bird flu still appears regularly in Europe

A broiler farm in Houtulst, Flanders, which was preventively destroyed last Tuesday, also appears to be affected. The farm was evacuated last week after a bird flu-infected turkey was near the farm. Also, a turkey farm in Caerle, Kloppenburg, West Germany, was infected with bird flu on January 4.

The Sciensano laboratory detected the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in broilers from Houthulst in several samples taken during the quarantine. The Federal Agency for Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) has informed this.

Chicken farms (broiler farms), which were first slaughtered for containment, are therefore considered contaminated. The broilers involved have yet to show any symptoms. Hence contamination is detected at a very early stage. As for the place and time of this contamination, practically nothing changes. Zones, activities and planned degradations remain unchanged. However, the Houtulst protection zone will, in the best case scenario, be released only on 26 January 2023. This is a day later than originally planned.

Bird flu still appears regularly in Europe

Although fortunately there have been no outbreaks of bird flu in the Netherlands in recent weeks, several European countries have seen outbreaks of bird flu in poultry farms in recent weeks. For example, the virus has continued to appear in poultry farms in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Denmark and Spain in recent weeks.

For example, a turkey farm in Caerle, Kloppenburg, West Germany, was infected with bird flu on January 4. About 12,000 turkey poults around 20 weeks of age are infected. The German Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut has already confirmed the H5 virus, with laboratory results of the serotype still pending. Turkeys are butchered.

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