Europe sends its flagship commercial satellite, Quantum, into space – News

Quantum is the pure marketing name for a revolutionary commercial satellite that the European Space Agency and a few European companies in principle will send into space at the end of July. It is pioneer that it can be reprogrammed after launch.

Quantum is the pure marketing name for a revolutionary commercial satellite that the European Space Agency and a few European companies in principle will send into space at the end of July. It’s unprecedented to be reprogrammed after launch, as revealed Tuesday during an online press conference. After all, the new satellite is the first commercial satellite capable of adapting to customer needs in terms of coverage, signal strength, frequency range and bandwidth.

The needs of potential users change, certainly over a period of fifteen years. And satellite makers haven’t always been able to respond to this, especially after launch.

From a geostationary orbit at 48 degrees east longitude, Quantum can respond to these changing space needs via a special program. The satellite can transmit data, communications and entertainment precisely wherever and whenever it is necessary. Precisely because users can choose how they want to route packets. Their orientation can adapt in real time to provide information, for example, to passengers traveling by plane or ship.

The eight packets can also be adjusted at the touch of a button, allowing more data to be sent when needed.

Reconfiguring between two tasks will only take a few minutes. The 3.5-ton satellite will operate in the Ku range.

For Quantum, the British Space Agency, British Space Agency, European satellite operator Eutelsat, satellite builder Airbus Defense and Space and British satellite builder Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) have joined. Airbus built the payload in Portsmouth, and the SSTL provided the platform. The test was carried out at Airbus in Toulouse.

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In principle, the launch will take place on July 27, with the Ariane-5 launcher from the European launch site Kourou. Quantum is due to enter service in October and has a lifespan of up to 15 years.

Eutelsat did not say who the first Quantum customers were. The global budget is more than 300 million euros, with a contribution of 90 million euros from the European Space Agency.

Quantum is the pure marketing name for a revolutionary commercial satellite that the European Space Agency and a few European companies in principle will send into space at the end of July. It’s unprecedented to be reprogrammed after launch, as revealed Tuesday during an online press conference. After all, the new satellite is the first commercial satellite capable of adapting to customer needs in terms of coverage, signal strength, frequency range and bandwidth. The needs of potential users change, certainly over a period of fifteen years. And satellite makers haven’t always been able to respond to this, especially after launch. From a geostationary orbit at 48 degrees east longitude, Quantum can respond to these changing space needs via a special program. The satellite can transmit data, communications and entertainment precisely wherever and whenever it is necessary. Precisely because users can choose how they want to route packets. Their orientation can adapt in real time to provide information, for example, to passengers traveling by plane or ship. The eight packets can also be adjusted at the touch of a button, allowing more data to be sent when needed. Reconfiguring between two tasks will only take a few minutes. The 3.5-ton satellite will operate in the Ku range. For Quantum, the British Space Agency, British Space Agency, European satellite operator Eutelsat, satellite builder Airbus Defense and Space and British satellite builder Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) have joined. Airbus built the payload in Portsmouth, and the SSTL provided the platform. The test was carried out at Airbus in Toulouse. In principle, the launch will take place on July 27, with the Ariane-5 launcher from the European launch site Kourou. Quantum should enter service in October and has a lifespan of up to 15 years. Eutelsat did not say who the first Quantum customers were. The global budget is more than 300 million euros, with a contribution of 90 million euros from the European Space Agency.

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