Graetheid Committee Foundation Against the Coming of the Black Bear to Chemelot

In the future, Chemelot wants to switch to green raw materials instead of naphtha and natural gas in the context of its sustainability goals.

This requires a major modification of the site. Factories must be built to convert waste (plastic and other waste) into raw materials for the production of fertilizers and polymers. Lots of waste storage space will also be required. This takes up a lot of space on the current site, according to the Graetheid Commission.

Even the committee fears that space outside the current site will be needed. Additionally, this is done at the expense of the environment (noise, odor, emissions).

In a letter to the municipality, Graetheid says, “It is not without reason that Chemelot’s Master Plan 2020 states that ‘companies with demonstrated value added are accepted to fulfill Chemelot’s ambition in sustainability”.

Graetheid understands that recycling of automobile tires is beneficial, but questions the added value to Chemelot’s sustainability. Recycling produces 14,000 tons / year of pyrolysis oil, which can be used as an alternative to naphtha. SABIC consumes 3 million tons of naphtha annually. Thus, the contribution of the black bear is less than one percent, which is a drop in the ocean. Hence this is of no value to Chemelot’s sustainability. However, according to the Graetheid Commission, a significant claim is made for space in Chemelot, physically and in the environmental and nitrogen space.

Additionally, the Black Bear has a bad reputation for safety and the environment. In February 2019, an experimental plant of the Black Bear in Nederweert burned down. But Chemelot’s reputation for safety isn’t as good either. According to the Graetheid Commission, this is evidenced by recent investigations by the Dutch Safety Council.

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The Graetheid Committee found the location of the Black Bear plant at Chemelot to be extremely undesirable, because the company occupies the space needed to make Chemelot more sustainable, because the Black Bear itself hardly contributes to sustainability and due to safety risks.
Graetheid Committee Foundation Against the Coming of the Black Bear to Chemelot

Chemelot wants to switch to bio-raw materials instead of naphtha and natural gas in the future.

This requires a major modification of the site. Factories must be built to convert waste (plastic and other waste) into raw materials for the production of fertilizers and polymers. Lots of waste storage space will also be required. This takes up a lot of space on the current site, according to the Graetheid Commission.

Even the committee fears that space outside the current site will be needed. Additionally, this is done at the expense of the environment (noise, odor, emissions).

In a letter to the municipality, Graetheid says, “It is not without reason that Chemelot’s Master Plan 2020 states that ‘companies with demonstrated value added are accepted to fulfill Chemelot’s ambition in sustainability”.

Graetheid understands that recycling of automobile tires is beneficial, but questions the added value to Chemelot’s sustainability. Recycling produces 14,000 tons / year of pyrolysis oil, which can be used as an alternative to naphtha. SABIC consumes 3 million tons of naphtha annually. Thus, the contribution of the black bear is less than one percent, which is a drop in the ocean. Hence this is of no value to Chemelot’s sustainability. However, according to the Graetheid Commission, a significant claim is made for space in Chemelot, physically and in the environmental and nitrogen space.

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Additionally, the Black Bear has a bad reputation for safety and the environment. In February 2019, an experimental plant of the Black Bear in Nederweert burned down. But Chemelot’s reputation for safety isn’t as good either. According to the Graetheid Commission, this is evidenced by recent investigations by the Dutch Safety Council.

The Graetheid Committee found the location of the Black Bear plant at Chemelot to be extremely undesirable, because the company occupies the space needed to make Chemelot more sustainable, because the Black Bear itself hardly contributes to sustainability and due to safety risks.
Graetheid Committee Foundation Against the Coming of the Black Bear to Chemelot

Chemelot wants to switch to bio-raw materials instead of naphtha and natural gas in the future.

This requires a major modification of the site. Factories must be built to convert waste (plastic and other waste) into raw materials for the production of fertilizers and polymers. Lots of waste storage space will also be required. This takes up a lot of space on the current site, according to the Graetheid Commission.

Even the committee fears that space outside the current site will be needed. Additionally, this is done at the expense of the environment (noise, odor, emissions).

The Graetheid Committee stated in a letter to the municipality: “It is not without reason that Chemelot’s Master Plan for 2020 states that“ companies with demonstrated value added will be accepted to fulfill Chemelot’s sustainability ambition ”.

Graetheid understands that recycling of automobile tires is beneficial, but questions the added value to Chemelot’s sustainability. Recycling produces 14,000 tons / year of pyrolysis oil, which can be used as an alternative to naphtha. SABIC consumes 3 million tons of naphtha annually. Thus, the contribution of the black bear is less than one percent, which is a drop in the ocean. Hence this is of no value to Chemelot’s sustainability. According to the Graetheid Commission, a major claim is being made regarding space at Chemelot, in terms of physical, environmental and nitrogen space.

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Additionally, the Black Bear has a bad reputation for safety and the environment. In February 2019, an experimental plant of the Black Bear in Nederweert burned down. But Chemelot’s reputation for safety isn’t as good either. According to the Graetheid Commission, this is evidenced by recent investigations by the Dutch Safety Council.

The Graetheid Committee found the location of the Black Bear plant at Chemelot to be extremely undesirable, because the company occupies the space needed to make Chemelot more sustainable, because the Black Bear itself hardly contributes to sustainability and due to safety risks.

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