Helado Negro seeks insights and discoveries into his inner universe on “Far In” – CD of the Week

Two years after the success of his album, that’s how you smile Helado Negro is shedding light on the missing and searched in the United States on a new double album.

At the time, it was the Beatniks who introduced the expression “far out” into their jazz language. Then the hippies took to it on their psychedelic quest. Anything in or outside the comprehension perimeter was eligible. On his new album, Roberto Carlos Lange, aka Hilado Negro, simply reflects the formula: “Away within.” Because our inner universe is also an unlimited field of insights and discoveries…

At the time, it was the Beatniks who introduced the expression “far out” into their jazz language. Then the hippies took to it on their psychedelic quest. Anything in or outside the comprehension perimeter was eligible. On his new album, Roberto Carlos Lange, aka Hilado Negro, simply reflects the formula: “Away within.” Because our inner universe is also an unlimited realm of insights and discoveries. “We are just light from the stars shining on the planets/constellations of our love and magic,” Lange sings to his lover during Gemini and Leo, masterfully cutting disco to test the parquet slip quality. ‘Cosmic synthfolk’ is how Pitchfork described Helado Negro’s voice in 2019 on his hit album This Is How You Smile. This definition covers (largely) the burden. Because the son of Ecuadorean immigrants in Florida comes in different forms. It’s a troubadour who writes his words in both English and Spanish for example. In moments like these, his good friend Devendra Banhart is never far away, as in the Vibraphone Synthesizer, the Aguas Frías and in the Ripple, subtly sprinkled with Wind Conversations’ strings. Hometown Dream is a wonderful dream about wandering skepticism and homesickness, about solidifying and letting go of it again. Sometimes Helado Negro’s songs are set at the intersection of a new age and a new wave, and sometimes he resolutely chooses more frivolous (dance) melodies, such as Gemini and Leo, Hot Chip singles Outside the Outside and Aureole, slow-motion disco with synths chirping and funk bass guitar. Whether Lange uses purple-toned steel drums on top of that or unleashes the denial of heated saxophones during Thank You for Ever, in the end an unmistakable silhouette emerges. Those of a pop author who casts a pastel light of shadow on misfits, on the little guy and his place in the big picture. Just as Jarvis Cocker Wulf dissected the misfits of northern England, Lange, with a softly waving voice and a big reassuring heart, expresses for the missing and the seekers, including himself.

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