Norway makes Europe less dependent on Russian gas

Norway has approved several new permits for gas production. The government announced this on Wednesday. By maintaining its production, the country is helping Europe reduce its dependence on Russian gas.

This relates to the permits for the offshore natural gas fields Oseberg, Troll and Heidrun. “The approved permits will not significantly increase Norway’s total daily gas production, but will help maintain current high export volumes of Norwegian gas,” the Energy Ministry said in a statement.

Up to a quarter of natural gas in the EU and UK comes from Norway. It is transported via a network of undersea pipelines.

Russia supplies about 45 percent of Europe’s natural gas. After Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine, the European Union is trying to reduce its dependence on Russian gas.

Norwegian energy company Equinor says the Oseberg gas field could boost exports by about 1 billion cubic meters until September 30 (after which maintenance is planned). For Heidrun, exports could be increased by 400 million cubic meters this year. According to Equinor, the additional capacity could cover the demand of nearly 1.4 million European households for a year.

Gazprom still supplies gas to Europe via Ukraine

Despite the invasion of Ukraine, Russia says it will continue to pump gas through the neighboring country to Europe, albeit slightly less than it did on Tuesday. According to the Russian news agency TASS, 95 million cubic meters will be delivered to the West on Wednesday. 109.6 million cubic meters were delivered on Tuesday.

Gazprom recently reported increased demand for natural gas and noted the cold winter weather in Europe. The company confirmed that all contracts will be fulfilled. The Russian economy is highly dependent on energy supply revenues.

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Gazprom said on Tuesday that gas shipments in the first two and a half months of the year fell 0.8 percent from the same period last year to 111.5 billion cubic meters. However, in the first half of March, more gas flowed to countries outside the CIS economic zone than in the first two weeks of January and February.

On the other hand, deliveries to nine EU countries increased significantly compared to the same period last year. Deliveries to Croatia doubled, exports to Italy increased by more than 50 percent and exports to Poland increased by more than 70 percent.

This relates to the permits for the offshore natural gas fields Oseberg, Troll and Heidrun. “The approved permits will not significantly increase Norway’s total daily gas production, but will help maintain current high export volumes of Norwegian gas,” the Ministry of Energy said in a statement. Up to a quarter of natural gas in the EU and UK comes from Norway. It is transported via a network of undersea pipelines. Russia supplies about 45 percent of Europe’s natural gas. After Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine, the European Union is trying to reduce its dependence on Russian gas. Norwegian energy company Equinor says the Oseberg gas field could boost exports by about 1 billion cubic meters until September 30 (after which maintenance is planned). For Heidrun, exports could be increased by 400 million cubic meters this year. According to Equinor, the additional capacity could cover the demand of nearly 1.4 million European households for a year. Despite the invasion of Ukraine, Russia says it will continue to pump gas through the neighboring country to Europe, albeit slightly less than it did on Tuesday. According to the Russian news agency TASS, 95 million cubic meters will be delivered to the West on Wednesday. 109.6 million cubic meters were delivered on Tuesday, and Gazprom recently announced increased demand for natural gas and cited cold winter weather in Europe. The company confirmed that all contracts will be fulfilled. The Russian economy is highly dependent on energy supply revenues. Gazprom said on Tuesday that gas shipments in the first two and a half months of the year fell 0.8 percent from the same period last year to 111.5 billion cubic meters. However, in the first half of March, more gas flowed to countries outside the CIS economic zone than in the first two weeks of January and February. On the other hand, deliveries to nine EU countries increased significantly compared to the same period last year. Deliveries to Croatia doubled, exports to Italy increased by more than 50 percent and exports to Poland increased by more than 70 percent.

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